Istanbul: Hagia Sophia and the Grand Bazaar

I’m sure I will come back to see these many more times while I’m in Istanbul, but I had a chance to take a quick view of two of the amazing sites here in this great city. It is my second visit to both the Hagia Sophia (Ayasofia in Turkish) and the Grand Bazaar (Kapalıçarşı in Turkish), so I was able to sure as an impromptu tour guide to another new teacher.

The Haiga Sophia, originally a  Greek Orthodox Church (the third on this site) dedicated to the Holy Wisdom of God. Later it became an imperial mosque. It has been a museum since 1935.
The Haiga Sophia, originally a Greek Orthodox Church (the third on this site) dedicated to the Holy Wisdom of God. Later it became an imperial mosque. It has been a museum since 1935.

Here is what Wikipedia says about the Hagia (EYE uh) Sophia (heavily edited):

Hagia Sophia (from the Greek: Ἁγία Σοφία, “Holy Wisdom”) is a former Greek Orthodox patriarchal basilica (church), later an imperial mosque, and now a museum (Ayasofya Müzesi) in Istanbul, Turkey. From the date of its construction in 537 until 1453, it served as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral and seat of the Patriarchate of Constantinople. The building was a mosque from 1453 until 1931. It was then secularized and opened as a museum on 1 February 1935.

The church was dedicated to the Wisdom of God, the Logos, the second person of the Holy Trinity, its patronal feast taking place on 25 December, the commemoration of the birth of the incarnation of the Logos in Christ.  Famous in particular for its massive dome, it is considered the epitome of Byzantine architecture[6] and is said to have “changed the history of architecture”.  It remained the world’s largest cathedral for nearly a thousand years, until Seville Cathedral was completed in 1520. The current building was originally constructed as a church between 532 and 537 on the orders of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I and was the third Church of the Holy Wisdom to occupy the site.

In 1453, Constantinople was conquered by the Ottoman Turks under Sultan Mehmed II, who ordered this main church of the Orthodox Christianity converted into a mosque. The bells, altar, iconostasis, and sacrificial vessels and other relics were removed and the mosaics depicting Jesus, his Mother Mary, Christian saints and angels were also removed or plastered over. Islamic features – such as the mihrab, minbar, and four minarets – were added. It remained a mosque until 1931. It was re-opened in 1935 as a museum by the Republic of Turkey. Haghia Sophia is currently (2014) the second-most visited museum in Turkey, attracting almost 3.3 million visitors annually.

This is on the taxi ride to the Ayasofia--from the window, we can see part of the original city wall. I'm not sure how old this would be, but people were living here in 1000BCE, and it was a Roman city by 400AD. This was part of the walls that the Ottoman Turks stormed in 1453 to take over Constantinople. So much to learn.
This is on the taxi ride to the Ayasofia–from the window, we can see part of the original city wall. I’m not sure how old this would be, but people were living here in 1000BCE, and it was a Roman city by 400AD. This was part of the walls that the Ottoman Turks stormed in 1453 to take over Constantinople. So much to learn.
The four minarets were added after the Ottoman's took over the city. This is the entrance. Much of the building is getting extensive renovation, so there's scaffolding everywhere. When I was here in 2008, We could see some structures from the previous church, but these are not available now.
The four minarets were added after the Ottoman’s took over the city. This is the entrance. Much of the building is getting extensive renovation, so there’s scaffolding everywhere. When I was here in 2008, We could see some structures from the previous church, but these are not available now.

 

The Christian altar was replaced by the mihrab (center) when it became a mosque in the 1400's, The mihrab shows the direction of prayer (facing Mecca).
The Christian altar was replaced by the mihrab (center) when it became a mosque in the 1400’s, The mihrab shows the direction of prayer (facing Mecca).
Many of the original mosaics were simply plastered over, not removed, when this became a mosque. The plaster has been removed, but many of the mosaics are in need of repair.  Muslims covered or removed all images because do not have them in a mosque (for fear that the images, and not God, would be worshiped). The large, round medallions have the names of God in calligraphy.
Many of the original mosaics were simply plastered over, not removed, when this became a mosque. The plaster has been removed, but many of the mosaics are in need of repair.
Muslims covered or removed all images because do not have them in a mosque (for fear that the images, and not God, would be worshiped). The large, round medallions have the names of God in calligraphy.
Mosaics.
Mosaics.
Fountain (Şadırvan) for ritual ablutions. This is to wash before entering the mosque.
Fountain (Şadırvan) for ritual ablutions. This is to wash before entering the mosque.

The Grand Bazaar is huge and a great place to see even if you aren’t much of a buyer. From Wikipedia: The Grand Bazaar in Istanbul is one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world, with 61 covered streets and over 3,000 shops which attract between 250,000 and 400,000 visitors daily. In 2014, it is listed No.1 among world’s most-visited tourist attractions with 91,250,000 annual visitors.  The Grand Bazaar is located inside the walled city of Istanbul, in the district of Fatih. The construction of the Grand Bazaar’s core started during the winter of 1455/56, shortly after the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople. Sultan Mehmet II had an edifice erected devoted to the trading of textiles.

Inside the Grand Bazaar.
Inside the Grand Bazaar.
Outside the Bazaar.
Outside the Bazaar.
Dried fruits, nuts, spices, jams and candies. YUM.
Dried fruits, nuts, spices, jams and candies. YUM.

First day in Turkey

My first meal in Turkey--lamb kebab, rice pilov, yoghurt, roasted vegetables.
My first meal in Turkey–lamb kebab, rice pilov, yoghurt, roasted vegetables.

My flight to Istanbul, via Kuala Lumpur, was mercifully uneventful, but long. Sixteen hours getting there, plus customs, passport control and a 6 hour time difference. But I’m here and safe, staying in a hotel and trying to get on Turkey time. I should see my school for the first time tomorrow.

The weather here is good, highs in the 60’s F, sunshine. The folks at the hotel and the restaurant across the street speak fair English. I’ve even met another new teacher, Edgar, from Huston.

I’ve been walking and trying to stay awake all day to adjust to the new time zone. Of course I don’t know the language or the neighborhood, but it’s funny how the ear tries so hard to make sense of the words it hears. I did this some in Vietnam, but it’s very strong here in Istanbul.

And I’ve already heard the call to prayer from a nearby mosque. Here are a few first photos.

This is pieces of lamb on a spit, called donor--amazing.
This is pieces of lamb on a spit, called donor–amazing.
The street outside my hotel.
The street outside my hotel.
The street outside my hotel,
The street outside my hotel,
Always construction going on. I wonder how old the walls of the foundation are? And what amazing things you find when you dig in this city? Istanbul was established about 1000BC. The nearby highway was part of the silk road.
Always construction going on. I wonder how old the walls of the foundation are? And what amazing things you find when you dig in this city? Istanbul was established about 1000BC. The nearby highway was part of the silk road.
One of the mosques nearby,
One of the mosques nearby,
I'm going to get so fat......
I’m going to get so fat……
Fresh meat and seafood.
Fresh meat and seafood.
....and the pastries.
….and the pastries.
Fresh fruits and vegetables everywhere.
Fresh fruits and vegetables everywhere.