Chora Church

Cora church, Istanbul, Nov 2015, 6I had been to this church in 2008 when I was on a tour of Turkey, but wanted to return for a closer look. Unfortunately, the extensive renovations meant that I really didn’t get to see much of the building, perhaps half. Still, the mosaics alone are incredible and the frescoes better than you would expect for the age. The reconstruction work may take years, so I may never see it complete.

Cora church, Istanbul, Nov 2015, 7According to Wikipedia: The Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora (Turkish: Kariye Müzesi, Kariye Camii, Kariye Kilisesi — the Chora Museum, Mosque, or Church) is a former Byzantine church, later Ottoman mosque, and current museum in the Edirnekapı neighborhood of Istanbul.[1] The neighborhood is situated in the western part of the municipality (belediye) of the Fatih district. In the 16th century, during the Ottoman era, the church was converted into a mosque, before becoming a museum in 1948. The interior of the building is covered with the original Byzantine-era mosaics and frescoes unearthed after its secularization.

My guidebook focuses on the mosaics that describe the life of Mary, but I remember our guide (the best tour guide I have ever met) telling us more about the life of Joseph, which I found fascinating at the time. Now, those mosaics are in an area that is off limits.

Cora church, Istanbul, Nov 2015, 10 Cora church, Istanbul, Nov 2015, 11 Cora church, Istanbul, Nov 2015, 14 Cora church, Istanbul, Nov 2015, 16

Across from the church entrance. Bache means garden.
Across from the church entrance. The sign roughly reads “Kiosk for family, Tea Garden restaurant and cafe.” See? My Turkish is improving!
This is the neighborhood beside the church. You can't get a good look at the church from the outside now because of scaffolding.
This is the neighborhood beside the church. You can’t get a good look at the church from the outside now because of scaffolding.
The church is built just inside the old city walls.
The church is built just inside the old city walls.
I got there on the metro.
I got there on the metro.
Even the art in the metro is nice.
Even the art in the metro is nice.
They really spend a lot of time on landscaping here. Public spaces are very beautiful.
They really spend a lot of time on landscaping here. Public spaces are very beautiful.

The New Mosque

It's so big and the area so crowded, I had trouble getting far enough back to get a photo!
It’s so big and the area so crowded, I had trouble getting far enough back to get a photo!
The perfect break! Baklava and tea.
The perfect break! Baklava and tea.

In America, we think of something that’s 100 years old as being “very old.” Here in Istanbul, 100 years is barely considered “dusty.”

The Yeni Cami (Yen ee Jam ee) is one of the important items on the skyline, and shoreline, of Istanbul. The name means New Mosque, though “new” is clearly relative. It was completed in 1663. It was originally named the Valide Sultan Mosque. Begun in 1597, there were starts and stops, plus some partial reconstructions along the way, gaining it the name New Valide Sultan Mosque. Eventually, the population just called it the New Mosque. It’s an Ottoman imperial mosque located in the Eminönü quarter of Istanbul, Turkey. Located on the Golden Horn, the mosque is right at the at the Eminönü Metro tram stop and within view of the Galata Bridge.

The exterior of the mosque boasts 66 domes and semi domes, as well as two minarets. You can, BTW, know the importance of a mosque by the number of minarets (towers). Only a sultan (or his family, who also carry the title of sultan, even the mother and daughters) could have a mosque with two minarets. Imagine how important that makes the Hagia Sophia (with four minarets) and The Blue Mosque (with 6).

This is where the ablutions really take place. Men were lined up to wash their feet, face, eyes and ears as required before prayers. Hey, at least they are clean! Bonus, you can almost always find a public rest room (WC) at a mosque. There may be a small donation to use it.
This is where the ablutions really take place. Men were lined up to wash their feet, face, eyes and ears as required before prayers. Hey, at least they are clean! Bonus, you can almost always find a public rest room (WC) at a mosque. There may be a small donation to use it.

An elegant şadırvan (ablution fountain) stands in the center courtyard, but is only ornamental. The actual ritual purifications are performed with water taps on the south wall of the mosque. Stone blocks supplied from the island of Rhodes were used in the construction of the mosque. The complete complex consists of a hospital (no longer in use), primary school, public baths, a türbe (cemetery), two public fountains and a market (The Spice Bazaar). The public square has undergone a recent renovation and the two fountains are now modern and new. Much of the rest was blocked from the public during renovations.

This woman sells wheat grain to feed the pigeons and they seem very well fed indeed. Fatih is the name of the district that the New Mosque is in. Belediyesi translates as "municipality." Odd the Turkish words I know, huh?
This woman sells wheat grain to feed the pigeons and they seem very well fed indeed. Fatih is the name of the district that the New Mosque is in. Belediyesi translates as “municipality.” Odd the Turkish words I know, huh?
Found this on the internet: "If you stop by the Yeni Camii at the entrance of the Spice bazaar (a.k.a The Egyptian Bazzar) you will surely observe the numerous flocks of pigeons feeding around the mosque. This is one of the most true and consistent vision of Istanbul, the pigeons and hence the pigeon feeders. The crowd of pigeons here is tremendous and honestly the season doesn’t matter at all. Here pigeons always rely on constant food provided by the locals or the tourists. Wheat supply is sold for very little money in mobile stalls ..... Continuous feeding ends up with overwhelming pigeons but still you feel like feeding them. This is one of the musts I do whenever I am in the neighbourhood. I buy a plate of wheat and scatter it around on the pigeons like throwing a frisbee. After your visit to the mosque spend some time with the pigeons and they will relax you while you watch the hordes fly from one feeder to the other. It might even be scary at some times as the pigeons swoosh before you, just inches above your head, or face. I always believe that this is a magic show that everyone has to experience for themselves."   http://www.spottedbylocals.com/istanbul/the-pigeon-feeder/
Found this on the internet: “If you stop by the Yeni Camii at the entrance of the Spice bazaar (a.k.a The Egyptian Bazzar) you will surely observe the numerous flocks of pigeons feeding around the mosque. This is one of the most true and consistent vision of Istanbul, the pigeons and hence the pigeon feeders. The crowd of pigeons here is tremendous and honestly the season doesn’t matter at all.
Here pigeons always rely on constant food provided by the locals or the tourists. Wheat supply is sold for very little money in mobile stalls ….. Continuous feeding ends up with overwhelming pigeons but still you feel like feeding them. This is one of the musts I do whenever I am in the neighbourhood. I buy a plate of wheat and scatter it around on the pigeons like throwing a frisbee.
After your visit to the mosque spend some time with the pigeons and they will relax you while you watch the hordes fly from one feeder to the other. It might even be scary at some times as the pigeons swoosh before you, just inches above your head, or face. I always believe that this is a magic show that everyone has to experience for themselves.”
The entrance to the court yard. So many steps everywhere!
The entrance to the court yard. So many steps everywhere!
It was a busy day and I didn't go inside.
It was a busy day and I didn’t go inside.

The Spice Bazaar

Spice Bazaar has a total of 85 shops selling spices, Turkish delight and other sweets, jewellery, souvenirs, and dried fruits and nuts.
Spice Bazaar has a total of 85 shops selling spices, Turkish delight and other sweets, jewellery, souvenirs, and dried fruits and nuts.

4/4/2015

The local name of the bazaar, built in 1664.
The local name of the bazaar, built in 1664.

The world knows this ancient market place at The Spice Bazaar, located behind Yeni Camii (Yen ee Jam ee, New Mosque) near the Galata Bridge. But to those who live in Istanbul, this is Mısır Çarşısı (Musur Char shuh suh) , meaning Egyptian Bazaar. Located in the Eminönü quarter of the Fatih district, it is the second most famous covered shopping complex, after the Grand Bazaar.

According to Wikipedia: The building was endowed to the foundation of the New Mosque, and got its name “Egyptian Bazaar” (Turkish: Mısır Çarşısı) because it was built with the revenues from the Ottoman eyalet of Egypt in 1660. The word mısır has a double meaning in Turkish: “Egypt” and “maize”. This is why sometimes the name is wrongly translated as “Corn Bazaar”. The bazaar was (and still is) the center for spice trade in Istanbul, but in the last years more and more shops of other type are replacing the spice shops.

Unfortunately, it’s mostly a tourist trap these days—mandatory to see, of course, but prices are high and it’s not where the locals shop.

The building itself is part of the complex of the New Mosque. The revenues from the rented shops inside the bazaar building are used for the up keep of the mosque. This seems to be a common scheme and perhaps Christian churches should do the same.
The building itself is part of the complex of the New Mosque. The revenues from the rented shops inside the bazaar building are used for the up keep of the mosque. This seems to be a common scheme and perhaps Christian churches should do the same.
You can almost hear the sea from this seller's stand. If the New Mosque (Yeni Camii) wasn't in the way, you could see it. In a word: fresh.
You can almost hear the sea from this seller’s stand. If the New Mosque (Yeni Camii) wasn’t in the way, you could see it. In a word: fresh.
This is Bazad panir--white cheese. No Turk worth his salt would start the day without this and a handful of olives.
This is Beyaz Panir–white cheese. No Turk worth his salt would start the day without this and a handful of olives with his çay (chai, tea).

 

You may enjoy this article on buying spices here at the bazaar. http://fxcuisine.com/default.asp?language=2&Display=77&resolution=high
You may enjoy this article on buying spices here at the bazaar.
Just outside the entrance is a new square, complete with benches and modern fountains. This was completed about a year ago. On this perfect early spring day, it was a busy place.
Just outside the entrance is a new square, with benches and modern fountains. This was completed about a year ago. On this perfect early spring day, it was a busy place.

Flower market and park, 2015-04-03, 6

Just outside the Spice Market was a flower market--which also had pets.
Just outside the Spice Market was a flower market–which also had pets…….
...and leeches. Ewwwww.
…and leeches. Ewwwww.
Pet supplies and flower seeds.
Pet supplies and flower seeds.
I am happy to report that I can actually read this sign, and not just the English translation at the bottom.
I am happy to report that I can actually read this sign, and not just the English translation at the bottom. Progress!

The Theodosian Walls

The 5th-century city walls built by Emperor Theodosius II stretch for 6.5 km (4 miles) from Istanbul's Golden Horn to the Sea of Marmara.  I initially thought this woman was foraging, but when I got closer I realized she had a garden. Most of the area in front of the walls seems to be produce!
The 5th-century city walls built by Emperor Theodosius II stretch for 6.5 km (4 miles) from Istanbul’s Golden Horn to the Sea of Marmara.
I initially thought this woman was foraging, but when I got closer I realized she had a garden. Most of the area in front of the walls seems to be produce!

4/4/2015

The tulips were in bloom!
The tulips were in bloom!

Today was Saturday, my only full day off, so I decided to spend a few hours walking in the bright sunshine of spring in Istanbul. My path? To follow the remains of the old city walls—known as the Theodosian Walls. They are one of the most impressive remains of the Byzantine past, and they held off invaders for more than 1,000 years! I walked from Topkapı Metro  (Pronounced: Top Kap Uh. That final letter isn’t an “I” it’s the vowel pronounced uh) south to the Marmara Sea. I walked around the sea park, investigated a few old city gates and cemeteries, and walked back. Probably 4 miles in all. I’ll sleep well tonight! I do a lot of walking here in Istanbul, so I’m glad I’m in fair shape.

Most of the walls are in pretty poor shape. I walked along side, but my guidebook was very clear that climbing the walls was unsafe in every way. There's the danger of falling and of being accosted by thieves. Many homeless and questionable characters hang out here.
Most of the walls are in pretty poor shape. I walked along side, but my guidebook was very clear that climbing the walls was unsafe in every way. There’s the danger of falling and of being accosted by thieves. Many homeless and questionable characters hang out here.

It was cool and breezy, but the sun shone all day—perfect walking weather. The tulips are in bloom and (my favorite) daffodils. It is spring in the city of cities!

Cats everywhere around the ruins--I see them all over the world.
Cats everywhere around the ruins–I see them all over the world.

With 11 fortified gates and 192 towers, this double walled enclosure sealed in the landward side of the old city of Constantinople. The length of the wall is about 4 miles (6km), so I saw approximately half of it today. It extends from the Sea of Marmara to the Golden Horn, enclosing an area of about 2.5 square miles. As with many important old Roman cities, the “walls” are actually three layers, each taller and thicker than the one before. A thick inner wall had 60 foot towers that gave a view of any approaching enemy, by land or sea. The outer wall was lower, 26 feet high, with additional towers, offset and between the inner wall towers, creating unblocked line of sight. Both walls were made of alternating limestone blocks and red tile brick. This arrangement is attractive and helped them to withstand earthquakes. Between the walls was a 50 foot terrace, used to move military troops easily. (in many cities, this area is where the bazaar is) A second terrace ended in a short crenelated defense wall. In front of it all was a moat (which may or may not have had water) which was 60 feet across and 20 feet deep. Even dry, the moat would have kept large artillery from coming too close.

The walls were built between AD 412-422 (dates vary), mostly during the reign of Emperor Theodosius II (408-50). At the time, they were half a mile outside the city’s original Walls of Constantine, extending the city’s protected area. Though the older Constantine Walls were still standing when the Theodosian Walls were built, nothing remains of them today. In 447 an earthquake destroyed 54 (some reports say 57) of the towers and much of the sea wall. The timing could not have been worse as Attila the Hun was already in the Balkans and on his way to take over the city. For 60 straight days and nights, the population labored to repair the walls.

This park is clearly dedicated to TULIPS. There is even a statue of two tulip bulbs. But, I preferred the daffodils at the far entrance.
This park is clearly dedicated to TULIPS. There is even a statue of two tulip bulbs. But, I preferred the daffodils at the far entrance.

Ultimately the city finally fell from sheer weight of numbers of the Ottoman forces in May 1453 after a six-week siege. According to Wikipedia, “The walls were largely maintained intact during most of the Ottoman period, until sections began to be dismantled in the 19th century, as the city outgrew its medieval boundaries. Despite the subsequent lack of maintenance, many parts of the walls survived and are still standing today. A large-scale restoration program has been under way since the 1980s.”     

Just inside this city gate is a mosque and cemetery (turbesi).
Just inside this city gate is a mosque and cemetery (turbesi).
The headstones look like turbans.
The headstones look like turbans.
A simple marble area to wash before entering the mosque. Of course, only the men can expose their feet to make the ritual ablutions before prayer. The women all crowd the bathrooms.
A simple marble area to wash before entering the mosque. Of course, only the men can expose their feet to make the ritual ablutions before prayer. The women all crowd the bathrooms.
My guidebook calls the neighborhood just inside the walls "working class." I think that's pretty diplomatic.
My guidebook calls the neighborhood just inside the walls “working class.” I think that’s pretty diplomatic.
The wall has several openings--formerly city gates. Most were narrow since they might be walled up in case of attack. I have no idea how the cars get through, though. This is two way traffic and there is only room for one car width. Visibility is nil through the wall. Eeek.
The wall has several openings–formerly city gates. Most were narrow since they might be walled up in case of attack. I have no idea how the cars get through, though. This is two way traffic and there is only room for one car width. Visibility is nil through the two layers of wall. Eeek.
This end of the wall is at the Sea of Marmara and is part of a park. It was a lovely day and lots of barges were on the water.
This end of the wall is at the Sea of Marmara and is part of a park. It was a lovely day and lots of barges were on the water.
It was lovely seeing families picnic along the Marble Tower, the end of the wall. This tower was once actually in the sea.
It was endearing to see families picnic along the Marble Tower, the end of the wall. This tower was once actually in the sea.
This tower is at the end of the wall, at the Sea or Marmara, now a park.
This tower is at the end of the wall, at the Sea or Marmara, now a park.

The Orient Express

Built in 1890 by the Oriental Railway as the eastern terminus of the world famous Orient Express, Sirkeci Terminal has become a symbol of the city.
Built in 1890 by the Oriental Railway as the eastern terminus of the world famous Orient Express, Sirkeci Terminal has become a symbol of the city.

Since I was giving a test in class that night, I had most of the day free—no lesson plans to do! With a lovely spring day I set off to explore Historic Istanbul. I’m simply getting off at each tram stop in the Fatih (Fah Tee uh, the final letter is barely pronounced) area, the heart of Old Constantinople. Today’s stop was Eminönü, near the foot of the Galata Bridge, where the mouth of the Bosphorus opens to the Sea of Marmara. You can see the Galata tower across the sea and high on a hill.  It’s a busy tram stop, right on the water and a perfect place to pick up a ferry or cruise. But today I was traveling by foot.

I made several stops: The Spice Market (called the Egyptian Bazaar, locally), a flower market, and a retail areas where the locals shopped. I’ll post more about them later. But the real focus today was the Sirkeci Gar (SIR KAH JEE, gar means train station). Never heard of it, you say? This magnificent railway station was built to receive the long anticipated Orient Express, the train of book and movie legend than ran from Paris to Istanbul. This station, like so much else, is undergoing renovation, so much of the front is covered. It was opened in 1890, though the train had been running for about a year by then. In recent years, the new, modern train station has been built right alongside.

The 1,800 miles journey from France to Turkey took three days and both the Sirkeci Train Station and the Pera Palas Hotel were built just to receive its passengers. Only the wealthy and elite could afford to ride “The train of kings, the king of trains.” Its name is synonymous with intrigue and luxury travel.  This long distance, international ride inspired no fewer than 19 books, and Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express is the best known. During the Cold War, standards of luxury declined. Despite lowered service, the train continued to run twice weekly until 1977. A bygone era! The train did technically continue to run, in ever shortening lengths, finally stopping completely in 2009, a “victim of high-speed trains and cut-rate airlines”

The original Sirkeci Gar (SIR KAH JEE, gar means train station), This Istanbul train station, the end of the line for The Orient Express.
The original Sirkeci Gar (SIR KAH JEE, gar means train station), This Istanbul train station, the end of the line for The Orient Express.
One of the original engines. How very small it is!
One of the original engines. How very small it is!
There is still a restaurant in the building and my guidebooks says it's both popular and good. According to Wikipedia: "The terminal restaurant became a meeting point for journalists, writers and other prominent people from the media in the 1950s and 1960s. The same restaurant, today called "Orient Express", is a popular spot among tourists"
There is still a restaurant in the building and my guidebooks says it’s both popular and good. According to Wikipedia: “The terminal restaurant became a meeting point for journalists, writers and other prominent people from the media in the 1950s and 1960s. The same restaurant, today called “Orient Express”, is a popular spot among tourists”
According to Wikipedia: "The terminus, which was initially named "Müşir Ahmet Paşa Station", was opened on November 3, 1890, replacing the temporary one. The architect of the project was August Jasmund, a Prussian who was sent to Istanbul by the German government in order to study Ottoman architecture, but lectured architectural design at the School of Polytechnics in Istanbul (now Istanbul Technical University). The terminal building which rises on an area of 1,200 m2 (13,000 sq ft) is one of the most famous examples of European Orientalism, and has influenced the designs of other architects. The building was also modern, having gas lighting and heating in winter."
According to Wikipedia: “The terminus, which was initially named “Müşir Ahmet Paşa Station”, was opened on November 3, 1890, replacing the temporary one. The architect of the project was August Jasmund, a Prussian who was sent to Istanbul by the German government in order to study Ottoman architecture, but lectured architectural design at the School of Polytechnics in Istanbul (now Istanbul Technical University). The terminal building which rises on an area of 1,200 m2 (13,000 sq ft) is one of the most famous examples of European Orientalism, and has influenced the designs of other architects. The building was also modern, having gas lighting and heating in winter.”
The roof of the new building covers the old, helping to preserve it.
The roof of the new building covers the old, helping to preserve it.
This is a death mask of Ataturk. His face is everywhere. The quote is a tad difficult for me to translate with my elementary Turkish, but it's something about being happy to be Turks.
This is a death mask of Ataturk. His face is everywhere. The quote is a tad difficult for me to translate with my elementary Turkish, but it’s something about being happy to be Turks.
Though all the signage is in Turkish, there is a jam packed little museum, free to the public.
Though all the signage is in Turkish, there is a jam packed little museum, free to the public.
The small museum has an old engineer's car.
The small museum has an old engineer’s car.
Info about the old terminal. The new one is built right alongside the old, incorporating it's space.
Info about the old terminal. The new one is built right alongside the old, incorporating it’s space.