A day of mixed blessings

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These are sıcak tatlı--hot sweets. First dough is deep fried as you see here. Then it's dropped in a sweet syrup to coat completely. Each ring is .50TL (about 10 cents) and eaten hot.
These are sıcak tatlı–hot sweets. First dough is deep fried as you see here. Then it’s dropped in a sweet syrup to coat completely. Each ring is .50TL (about 10 cents) and eaten hot.

10/24/2015
My first day back from Belgrade (photos to follow soon) has been disappointing at best. First, I have a cold. It’s not unusual when I travel to pick up a bug, but it’s inconvenient. It was raining when I landed in Istanbul and the rain continued through today–cool, wet and humid. The laundry I did will never dry. Shortly before I left Belgrade I was sent an email saying I have a new weekend morning class. I find it rude to give less than 48 hours’ notice for a class, but it’s the norm here. So, even though I got in late and I felt badly, I prepared my lesson plan for the next morning. I got up in the dark and walked to class in the rain. I printed my materials and then asked to see the register so I’d know how many copies to make. Except there was no class. It had been canceled. In fact, it had been canceled BEFORE I was even given the class! After a couple email exchanges, it turns out that out of the 5 new classes “scheduled” to begin this week (2 of which were mine), only one will actually begin. Did I mention we have issues? Part of the problem is disorganization. Part is a lack of bi-lingual staff. And part of the problem is a total lack of concern for teachers.

They are incredibly sticky and sweet, but one is very satisfying on a cold evening.
They are incredibly sticky and sweet, but one is very satisfying on a cold evening.

At my afternoon class, I set up my materials, then walked out to get my class register, which took 2 minutes. When I returned, three of my markers were gone. Stolen. I’m pretty sure it was Trudy (the ex-roommate), not that I have any way to prove that. But there were few students here. She’s been rude to my students on breaks and she picked a fight with another teacher last weekend. It feels like I’m back in 3rd grade.

But there were highlights. Before I left, One of my students had brought me a lovely pair of handmade slippers for me to give to my dear friend Kathy in Belgrade. They are beautiful. Her grandmother made them and they fit Kathy’s small feet perfectly. (My humongous feet would have stretched them out!) Kathy, being the considerate soul that she is, naturally wrote them thank you notes on a post card. You can’t imagine how thrilled they were–their first English letter!
Coming home from school today a young man got up and gave me his seat on the MetroBus. It’s been raining all day and the bus was packed, so it was a really nice gesture. At the next stop a man limped on and I realized he could barely stand. I started to get up, but the young man across from me motioned for me to stay put and he gave the man his seat. It was only then that I realized that the man was injured. He had a huge cut on his leg and had lost a lot of blood. It looked like someone had cut a chunk of meat from just below his knee—an open wound three inches wide and no skin to cover it. I gave the man some tissues and a plastic bag for the bloody used tissues, but that was all I had. He kept talking to me. I couldn’t make him understand that I don’t speak Turkish (I can say “I don’t speak Turkish. I speak English.”) Since I didn’t share a language with anyone on the bus, I don’t know what happened to him. He seemed delirious–he was talking to himself, and sometimes to someone out the window, who wasn’t there. He would almost lose consciousness, then perk up. He seemed too clean to be homeless, but I think there was something more wrong with him besides just the injury. My heart went out to him.

In a city this size you see so much sadness. It attracts a lot of refugees. But it really puts my piddly little problems into perspective.

Just saw this on FB: “not knowing” is the whole … point. Life is all about not knowing, and then doing something anyway. All of life is like this. All of it.”

This is Döner kebab, one of the most common street foods in Istanbul. This particular rotisserie of meat is chicken. The sliced meat is served wrapped in a flatbread called durum. Usually tomato and herbs are added too. While this looks like the Greek gyro, any Turk worth his salt will tell you otherwise! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doner_kebab
This is Döner kebab, one of the most common street foods in Istanbul. This particular rotisserie of meat is chicken. The sliced meat is served wrapped in a flatbread (like a tortilla) and called durum. Usually tomato and herbs are added too. While this looks like the Greek gyro, any Turk worth his salt will tell you otherwise!

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Beth

I'm a professional vagabond. I quit my cubical job in January 2014. Since then, I've hiked the Appalachian Trail, The Camino, and taught English in Vietnam, Turkey, Russia, Spain, Mexico and Peru. I'm exploring the world and you can come too!

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