My new apartment in Istanbul

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The view from my terrace. That's the Sea of Marmara past the buildings. When I'm feeling better, I'll walk to it. With so many people in this city, the water system can't quite cope, so we drink bottled water or at least boil the water before using.
The view from my terrace. That’s the Sea of Marmara past the buildings. When I’m feeling better, I’ll walk to it. With so many people in this city, the water system can’t quite cope, so we drink bottled water or at least boil the water before using.

3/25/2015
I slept 10 hours last night and slowly this virus is lifting. I find that traveling to a new country guarantees you are exposed to new “bugs” of all kinds, so eventually you are going to succumb to one. So far three weeks seems to be when I get sick. Will be glad when I am completely well again but I’m better each day.
In the meantime, I’ve been able to take a few photos of my new apartment. I moved in Friday March 20ith and have worked each day in addition to battling this cold, so it’s all I could do to get organized. It’s located in Şükrübey (pronounced: Shuk Ru Bay) and is just 8 metro bus stops from my school branch.

I have SIX roommates—but it isn’t as bad as it sounds. Upstairs are Katt (Canadian, tall and thin, organized and smart) and her husband Ali (Turkish, handsome and fluent in English) and Trudy (Canadian, hilariously funny and about my age. We are going to be such good friends). Katt and Ali own the apartment and another across the hall that is also rented to teachers. There is a large living room, huge terrace on their level. They share a kitchen and a bath on that floor. I’m on the lower (entrance) floor with Victoria (late 20’s, vegetarian, from Georgia, USA. She actually asked me if I knew where Dahlonaga, GA was!), Mags (late 20’s, amazing cook, funny), and Augustine (early 20’s, very tall, very thin, from South Africa). Our floor has a small terrace, medium sized kitchen, very large bath and the entry way to the apartment. Everyone is fairly clean and quiet, so far. No complaints.

My bedroom is called the gray room. View from the hallway door. It is located across from the bathroom. We each have private bedrooms. Mine is twice the size of the hotel room I just left. Good light, radiator heating. There's a washer, but we use drying racks for clothes (mine is against the wall).
My bedroom is called the gray room. View from the hallway door. It is located across from the huge bathroom. We each have private bedrooms. Mine is twice the size of the hotel room I just left. Good light, radiator heating. There’s a clothes washer in the bathroom, but no dryer. We each use drying racks for clothes (mine is against the wall).
Bedroom, view from the window. Glad I don't have much stuff, because that closet is all I have. But I am used to small spaces and have gotten a few items, like the tubs on top of the wardrobe, a bowl for fresh fruit and the hot pot on the desk. The bed has an interesting storage system under the mattress, called a bazaar--I have my backpack and suitcase under there and there is lots of other room if I needed it. Notice the bottle of water to the left--we drink bottled water or at least boiled water.
Bedroom, view from the window. Glad I don’t have much stuff, because that closet is all I have. But I am used to small spaces and have gotten a few items, like the tubs on top of the wardrobe, a bowl for fresh fruit and the hot pot on the desk. The bed has an interesting storage system under the mattress, called a bazaar–I have my backpack and suitcase under there and there is lots of other room if I needed it. Notice the bottle of water to the left–we drink bottled water or at least boiled water.

The apartment is well situated. I’ve not been well enough to investigate the neighborhood fully, but there is a small grocery in the bottom floor of the apartment building and a large one across the road. I am half a block from the metro bus line. Here are the parts I find amazing: 10. The road in front of my apartment building is part of the old Silk Road. Imagine the history. And 2). You can see the Sea of Marmara from the terrace window. I can walk to the sea!

I am so lucky. I love my life.

This is the kitchen I share with three others. There is another kitchen upstairs for the three occupants of that floor.  Gas oven. There aren't quite enough pieces of cookware or glasses. I'll probably end up adding to the supply. There is a small terrace outside this kitchen.
This is the kitchen I share with three others. There is another kitchen upstairs for the three occupants of that floor. Gas oven. There aren’t quite enough pieces of cookware or glasses. I’ll probably end up adding to the supply. There is a small terrace outside this kitchen.
The large living room upstairs is shared by everyone. There's wifi and cable TV. The door opens to the terrace.
The large living room upstairs is shared by everyone. There’s wifi and cable TV. The door opens to the terrace.
We are on the top level of the apartment building, so it's a great terrace and wraps around to the other side as well. There's a grill too.
We are on the top level of the apartment building, so it’s a great terrace and wraps around to the other side as well. There’s a grill too.
View from the terrace. Istanbul is a HUGE city. The "official " estimate is 20 million people. The unofficial estimate is 30 million. The road below was part of the Silk Road. The middle of the road is the metro bus lane. Buses run every minute or two. It takes 15-25 minutes to get to school from the time I leave my front door.
View from the terrace. Istanbul is a HUGE city. The “official ” estimate is 20 million people. The unofficial estimate is 30 million. The road below was part of the Silk Road. The middle of the road is the metro bus lane. Buses run every minute or two. It takes 15-25 minutes to get to school from the time I leave my front door.

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Beth

I'm a professional vagabond. I quit my cubical job in January 2014. Since then, I've hiked the Appalachian Trail, The Camino, and taught English in Vietnam, Turkey, Russia, Spain and Mexico. I'm exploring the world.

4 thoughts on “My new apartment in Istanbul”

  1. Awesome! Who would have thought a year ago as you unloaded stuff in preparation for the Application Trail you’d be in Istanbul teaching now?

    1. I know! It seems like a lifetime ago, and yet it was just a year ago that I was walking through ice storms and carrying everything I owned on my back. Frankly, I don’t have much more now than I did then! If my life were judged by my possessions, I wouldn’t look like much. Judge it by experiences and I’m rich beyond belief.

  2. I love the colors of the apartment, and that terrace is to die for!! Soooo much better than Vietnam. I can’t wait to visit!!

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