Trouble in Paradise

There's a Döner kebapci on every block in Istanbul--you can get a wrap (durum) or sandwich (samvic) for about 5TL. Döner is slices of meat on a rotating spit. The meat is usually lamb, but can be chicken, too.
There’s a Döner kebapci on every block in Istanbul–you can get a wrap (durum) or sandwich (samvic) for about 5TL. Döner is slices of meat on a rotating spit. The meat is usually lamb, but can be chicken, too.

4/16/2015
Istanbul is an amazing city. The history alone with worth the visit. Not to mention the baklava! And I do love teaching. The students seem to like my style. The flat I live in is ok—the one roommate who didn’t like me finished moving out yesterday, so that situation is looking up. At my branch, we has some great teachers and I particularly like my branch manager, Robert.

But the first serious issue just came up. Yesterday was payday. I didn’t get paid. No teacher at English Time in Istanbul got paid on the 15th as per our contract.

And it’s the second month in a row.

To be fair, last month, teachers were paid, just two days late. That’s likely to be the case this month, too.

But there are other red flags. I was promised I’d get a residence permit (the first step to a work permit) within days of arriving to Istanbul. We are coming up on 2 months; no permit. And two new teachers who came within days of me have not been found an apartment yet. They were told I got the last available apartment and they’ve been living in a tiny hotel room all this time. There are no plans to find living space for these two men, even though the contract clearly states that the company will find a place for you to live.

But the red flag that concerns me most is pretending there are no classes for some “inspectors.” This morning’s classes were canceled with less than 24 hours’ notice. Again. I’m pretty sure this is the fourth time. And the teachers aren’t allowed to be anywhere in the area. And the teachers don’t get paid even though no notice was given. When you don’t speak the predominate language, you often don’t know what’s going on. The office staff speaks little English, so there is no clear explanation, just the word “inspectors. “ What I’ve gathered is that the “inspectors” have something to do with taxes and the school is trying to hid how much business they are doing in order to pay less.

So, in short, I’m working for a company that lies, cheats and doesn’t pay on time. Oh joy.

This is the second company in a row with these issues. English Time is better than the school in Vietnam, but these are still serious issues. Is this how the English Teaching business works?

I had hoped I was working with a business where I could stay for awhile–maybe finish my 11 month contract and then move to another school location, perhaps in Antalya, for a second contract. Well, the second contract is out of the question. I don’t sign a second contract with a business that doesn’t honor the first one. Now, I am wondering if I can finish this contract.

Fishing off the Galata bridge
Fishing off the Galata bridge

Settling-in, in Istanbul

I am swamped with new classes, new curriculum, learning a new language/culture and getting settled in at my new apartment. But I do keep a short journal, occasionally.  The photos are from the Archeology Museum. I’m sure it’s an amazing place, but it’s under construction/reorganization/remodeling so many of the best items simply aren’t available to the public. I’ll return. Istanbul Archeology Museum, March 2015, 124/9/2015 Thursday
I’m teaching full-time, but weekday evening classes only last 6 weeks and I’ve joined most classes in progress. As a result, my Level 1 class finished up Tuesday night. I just love this group. Was thrilled that some of them contacted the office and asked for me as a teacher! So I will start their Level 2 class Monday. The students are mostly college age, here–no children like in Vietnam. They focus so much on grammar rules that I have to study to keep up with them! As a native English speaker, obviously I know how to say things, but you have to be able to explain why. Two of the new teachers are Hispanic and only speak English as a second language. Their accents are thick and their grammar poor. It’s difficult for their students and they’ve been removed from some classes. I don’t think they will make it. A LOT of new teachers wash out, particularly young ones. I don’t think they realize how much work it is to teach, particularly at first as you get used to a new school and curriculum.

Right now, while I’m learning the curriculum, I spend a lot of time preparing. Most evenings, I have a 3 hour class, and I spend at least that long preparing for the class. But it will get easier as I teach classes I’ve taught before. The school has already asked me to stay another year–even talked to me about management. I don’t want to manage, but I might consider another location in Turkey for a second year. I don’t have to make any decisions, yet.

My roommates are all 20-something and they make me feel old! I deal with the noise and the mess pretty well–frankly the three of them aren’t as messy as my single Vietnamese roommate, Bob, so that’s an improvement. But it’s a tiny kitchen and a single bath. With all their friends over it can be next to impossible to get into either room. And when their “overnight guests” hog the bathroom……it’s not really going that well.

It was a rainy day, so it wasn't inviting to sit outside among the ruins for tea.
It was a rainy day, so it wasn’t inviting to sit outside among the ruins for tea.
Cats of all kinds among the ruins.
Cats of all kinds among the ruins.

Later……

I went to Katt and Ali about noon today to ask about moving to another flat. Virginia simply doesn’t like me. Her boyfriend stays overnight—which is against the rules. Honestly, I don’t care what she does or with whom in her bedroom, but he hogs the bathroom! 45 minute showers in the morning! And when I asked who was in the bathroom (since all the residents were accounted for) NO ONE would answer my question. They ignored me as though I didn’t exist–As though I didn’t have the right to ask! Because I needed to pee and because I was curious, I simply waited to see who would exit the room. When her boyfriend came of of the bathroom (finally!) I just rolled my eyes. Later, I asked for a floor meeting to set ground rules about guests. After all, there are already four of us sharing a kitchen and a bathroom (with no real living room) so adding guests quickly gets to be an issue. The request was NOT well received. Virginia responded that it wasn’t needed. The other two didn’t respond at all.

And immediately, I began hearing interesting stories through the grapevine about Virginia’s opinion of me. And the dirty looks in the hallway confirm her feelings. Funny, since she was the one who told me all the “rules” and how much trouble I’d get in if I violated them. She explained them in a tone of a veiled threat! But I guess the rules don’t apply to her. I have tried to keep a low profile here at the flat. Which is easy because no one speaks to me. I would feel differently about this if I had actually complained. And it isn’t like I went to the landlords and told them about the overnight guests. I’m uncomfortable here. It’s no way to live. That’s why I asked to move. They told me they would see what they could do, but not to get my hopes up.

I wish you could see the detail on this statue. Breathtaking. But the photo quality is poor.
I wish you could see the detail on this statue. Breathtaking. But the photo quality isn’t good enough.
This is the actual chain that kept out invaders from sea! It was stretched across the mouth of the Golden Horn, keeping invaders out of Constantinople. Coupled with the land walls the city was secure for centuries.
This is the actual chain that kept out invaders from sea! It was stretched across the mouth of the Golden Horn, keeping invaders out of Constantinople. Coupled with the land walls the city was secure for centuries.
Information about the chain
Information about the chain

4/10/15 Friday
….and the roommate problems seem to have resolved themselves. I seriously didn’t intend to get Virginia kicked out. Yesterday, Victoria was told to leave the apartment. She’s been warned at least twice in the past about overnight guests. It’s clearly stated in the lease. And I was told that it’s a different “boyfriend” every time. Eeeeek! She has two weeks to get out. Unfortunately, Victoria blames me for this, and she has been very vocal about it. The next two weeks will not be fun. <sigh>

Such drama! I swear it’s the raging hormones. You can smell them in the air!

It’s a different world here. Last night, a young male student asked me to introduce him to a young female student from another class. I don’t know the girl, so I said no. He asked again, suggesting that I could tell her that he was a “good man” and could “help” her with her English. (Which is pretty hilarious considering his poor English.) I told him again that I couldn’t do this. I didn’t know him well enough to “endorse” him (so this also became a vocabulary lesson) and I had never met the young girl. I was not in a position to do this favor and I didn’t think this was something a teacher should do. He persisted, explaining (in broken English) that she would trust me if I said he was a good man. I said that was exactly why I couldn’t do it. I suggested that if he wanted to meet the girl, he should introduce himself. “No, Teacher. This Turkey. Cannot.”

IMHO, most young Turkish men are players: vain, overly concerned about their appearance with confidence fueled by testosterone and peer pressure. It reminds me of Italy. I’m glad to be above most of it, but it’s fun to be an audience. Sometimes.

I tried to show a video last night in our “cinema room” at school. I’ve been told that the equipment is pretty iffy and I don’t know that I’ll try again. The plan was to let the students watch a Mr. Bean video and practice describing actions. It failed miserably. First, the equipment proved unreliable. Then, the students simply couldn’t put together a full sentence to describe the action. I don’t think they have the vocabulary for this activity. The class is Level 3, so I feel they should have enough words to be able to do this—it’s an indication of how poor vocabulary training is in this curriculum. Baby steps. Will have to work on other simple descriptions first. Listening and Speaking, the final section, starts tonight for this class.

There was no information in English about this but it appears to be a sarcophagus, made of glazed pottery. Hope to learn more....
There was no information in English about this but it appears to be a sarcophagus, made of glazed pottery. Hope to learn more….
Fancy sarcophagus! How many people do they put in these things?
Fancy sarcophagus! How many people do they put in these things?

Much Later:
I didn’t like the way this man was looking at me on the Metro Bus. I couldn’t decide if he was angry or interested. Eventually, I decided it was a leer. OMG! He got off at my stop, but he turned left out of the bus. I was quite pleased that I was going right. But he reversed direction. Outside the station, he was clearly following me. I let him pass, but he stopped and talked to me, in Turkish. I smiled and said, “English” and tried to lose him again. He first walked on, but then stopped, spoke again and hooked his arm into mine so we could walk together. I politely untwined myself and said no. I even shook my finger at him. At the corner, he started to go straight, but stopped to watch me turn the corner. I said “bye, bye” firmly. He motioned for me to follow him. “Hayır Ya. Ben öğretmenim.” (“No. I’m a teacher.” If only I could say, “I’m not a prostitute.”) Then I picked up the pace to lose him. I decided that if he followed me to my apartment door, I would cross the street and go into the convenience store. I didn’t want him to know where I live or try to force his way into my door. He did not follow me, thankfully. I’m told it’s the blonde hair—only whores are blonde. To be fair, my hair is at least half gray by now. I’ve been growing it out for a year. But it still mystifies me. I don’t dress provocatively or wear much make up. I don’t start conversations, since I don’t speak Turkish. I’m surprised this has happened a few times, about once a week.

Later, I talked to some of the male teachers and they said I need to react more—be clearly offended, in any language. At the first leer, I should scowl. It the man doesn’t stop I should get verbal. They also think part of the issue is that I smile broadly—an open mouthed smile is flirting, here. Darn! To me, that’s just being friendly. Some of the long term, female teachers said they also have this problem frequently, regardless of their age. They avoid all eye contact, never smile or speak to anyone on the metro and sometimes just practice an “angry” look. Jeeze. I hope I don’t have to do this, but I don’t know what else to do.

I wanted to experience and understand another culture. That’s what this is, I guess.

I found this striking. The next photo has text about it.
I found this striking. The next photo has text about it.

Istanbul Archeology Museum, March 2015, 29Saturday 4/11/2015
In about 3 days I’ve gone from “New Teacher with a few classes” to “OMG, I can’t take another class” status. It’s pretty flattering, though, because student have actually gone to the office and asked for me. I think they like my (lack of an) accent. Once again that American-Midwestern that I speak helps out. And I have learned to speak more slowly. Not sure how I’m going to get through the next couple weeks, though.

It’s been a disappointing day, despite lovely weather. SOMEONE (I assume Victoria) has left the kitchen a total mess. AND I turned down an opportunity to go with Shelley, Maria and Kate to Galata Tower. I had a private lesson. Except the student didn’t show! So I came home, did my laundry (since no one was here) and have been working on lesson plans for the rest of the afternoon. Exciting Saturday night for me!

Monday 4/13/2015
Today I have 7 hours of class! The Level 5 class is shared with Albert—who doesn’t really want a co-teacher (which I actually completely understand). The students have asked for a native speaker, and he is Iranian. His English is great, but of course there are some pronunciation differences. I may have taken on more than I should, but I’m trying to work into a better schedule and that means than sometimes you have to overlap classes and work too many days in a row. Additionally, Gabriel is taking over Shelley’s portion of the Level 3 class that we shared. The students have complained about her. I don’t know the specifics. The class is certainly and handful. I’m exhausted after an evening with them, particularly if Ali is there. I was a fill-in, just 3 weeks ago, and wasn’t sure I’d last. Almost surprised that they are not complaining about me! But being a fill in means I didn’t have time to prepare for the class and I now know I could have done better. At the end of class, they are supposed to give a presentation for 10 minutes—this group has a hard time putting together a full sentence to describe an action! We should have been preparing the students for the final presentation and neither of us knew about it. We are new! I got to talk to Gabe about it and we have a plan for dealing with it, but it’s not the best. I wish someone had given me better advice on this Level 3, but I was just dealing with the class one section at a time—not good enough. Lesson learned.

I hate it, but Shelley isn’t doing that well here at English Time. She seems unhappy and now she’s been removed from a couple classes at the student’s request. We share a weekend class (which I will never do again). I have the students on Sunday, but they told me that they had trouble understanding her. I’ve tried to combat issues by reviewing all of her pages first thing on Sunday. They seem to need the review, but then, this isn’t surprising. It’s a very intensive course and a review of the previous material would help anyone. Grammar is the most difficult test and it comes first. I’ve been dismayed at the grades on the Grammar exams. I made up a special “mid-term” Grammar quiz. It has the format of the exam, but only uses two of the four verb tenses. I think it’s easier on them to see the types of questions and get a strong review of two tenses, just before they learn two new ones. I hope it will help them on the exam—which is coming up quickly! Shelley and Maria are going to Athens for a few days this week (yes, I was slightly hurt that I wasn’t asked, but the school could not have let all three of us go at one time, anyway). I’ll have the class Saturday and Sunday this coming week. I’ve got two new verb tenses to teach them and then review for the test, which should be the following weekend. Phew! I have no idea how they keep up!

This is the "nich" than marks the direction of prayer in a mosque.
This is the “nich” that marks the direction of prayer in a mosque.
Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great

Tuesday 4/14/15
I am exhausted, but it has been a great few days. Sunday is my four hour, Level 1 class. Great attitudes and they seem to really love me. They asked about me teaching the class both Saturday and Sunday—that they planned to go to the office to request this. I asked them not to, to give Shelley another chance. After all, I would have their class both Saturday and Sunday this coming weekend because Shelley is going with Maria to Greece. And I let them know that Shelley is new to teaching, so she is still learning. I hope this placated them. Sunday afternoon, I prepared my Monday morning class (Level 5), my Monday evening class (Level 2) AND my Friday activity (Past Perfect Verb tense) before I went to bed. Phew!

Monday and Tuesday will be split shifts for me for the next 6 weeks. I teach 10a-2p Level 5 and 7p to 10p Level 2. Since I usually need to do lesson plans between the two, it makes for a long day! I’m sure that I spend much longer preparing for classes than most teachers, but I’m just not a person who wants to “wing it.” There is enough in life that you can’t prepare for. Besides, these students deserve the best. My best.

Monday, I met my new Level 5 students. AMAZING VOCABULARY! I did a simple exercise, asking for adjectives. I find it’s a great way to know what level your students are at. I expected the usual adjectives: Beautiful, tall, pretty and handsome. I got these and so much more—fantastic, frugal, malevolent (!!!), awesome, jealous, furious…. This is a real testament to Albert, who has had most of this group since Level 2. Albert usually teaches classes without a co-teacher, so I feel a bit badly about being asked to teach with him. He usually works alone and he’s being forced to work with me—though he has been very gracious about it. I was asked to teach two of the five class days because the students asked for a native English speaker. Of course, that’s the best way to learn pronunciation, idioms and slang. Albert (an Iranian who can speak Turkish, Arabic AND English) knows a lot of this, of course, but I think they are more confident with a native English speaker. Albert has arranged a class that doesn’t focus on the English Time book. This is great! We do a grammar topic from it every day, but he has a wonderful vocabulary reference (504 Words you must know) and a listening/speaking book with MP3 files (Passages). I add about an hour’s worth of activities—that’s a four hour class!

Monday night was also the start of my Level 2 class—these are mostly students that I taught Level 1. I understand more about the layout of the English Time classes now, so I can adjust the schedule to stay on track AND teach what’s most important. Plus Albert has inspired me to expand vocabulary! The ET books are strong on Grammar and OK on reading and writing, but Vocabulary, Listening and Speaking are poorly represented. SO, I laid out for the class what we would learn in Grammar (3 new verb tenses, conjunctions, clauses, and if) and put at date to the tests (roughly). There are about 5 new students who took Level 1 with someone else. The rest know me pretty well. I think the new students are not quite sure about me, yet. I hope to win them over. My co-teacher is Kate, who is young, but a wonderful teacher. She spent the last year in South Korea. This will be a good class!

Tuesday morning (this morning) I had the Level 5 students again. (Obviously, I did this lesson plan yesterday afternoon, between classes.) If they were shy yesterday, they were not today. I found that at least two of them had actually gone to the office and THANKED them for letting me be their teacher!!! Can you imagine that? This would never happen in The States. I could have cried when I heard this. They ask insightful questions, and they love speaking. But it is an exhausting, jam-packed, 4 hours of class. I always have lots scheduled—including some fun activities. Today was vocabulary review (504 Words), Listening and discussion (Passages), Hot/Cold (an activity where I explain how Americans use these words to mean close and far away. We guide someone to candy we have hidden using cold/colder/warm/warmer/hot/red hot). We also did a warm up where we name 10 things from a category and we practiced rhyming (a good way to work on pronunciation while having fun). I like variety in the class—keeps them interested. I also dropped a few things so we could go over their homework they were having trouble with—passive voice.

I was exhausted and fell asleep between classes, after I planned my evening lesson, of course!). Naps are wonderful when you work a split shift.
Tonight’s Level 2 class really rolled—they had learned Simple Future (using “will”) before they even realized it, and got to practice it a lot (they already know Future “be” going to, so this is even easier). We also reviewed Simple Past Tense. We played Taboo to review the Geography vocabulary from the book (mountain, stream, sea, island…) and I found some vocabulary on transportation to introduce. Seems they knew about 30-40% of those words already—which I think is a good mix. It’s not overwhelming that way.

And now I’m home, showered and falling into bed. I’m grateful to just have one evening class tomorrow—I will sleep in!

In other news, Virginia is actively moving out. She isn’t even staying here at the apartment anymore. She says she will be out by tomorrow afternoon, not taking her 2 weeks. She does manage to wreck the kitchen when she’s here and doesn’t do her dishes or take out her garbage. But it will all be over by this time tomorrow. And Augustine will be going home for 3 weeks (South Africa). His Gran (grandmother) isn’t doing well so he’s going home to spend time with her. Shelley is moving somewhere tomorrow. I knew she wasn’t happy with her flat, but I know no details. She and Maria will leave for 3 days in Greece Thursday.

The New Mosque

It's so big and the area so crowded, I had trouble getting far enough back to get a photo!
It’s so big and the area so crowded, I had trouble getting far enough back to get a photo!
The perfect break! Baklava and tea.
The perfect break! Baklava and tea.

In America, we think of something that’s 100 years old as being “very old.” Here in Istanbul, 100 years is barely considered “dusty.”

The Yeni Cami (Yen ee Jam ee) is one of the important items on the skyline, and shoreline, of Istanbul. The name means New Mosque, though “new” is clearly relative. It was completed in 1663. It was originally named the Valide Sultan Mosque. Begun in 1597, there were starts and stops, plus some partial reconstructions along the way, gaining it the name New Valide Sultan Mosque. Eventually, the population just called it the New Mosque. It’s an Ottoman imperial mosque located in the Eminönü quarter of Istanbul, Turkey. Located on the Golden Horn, the mosque is right at the at the Eminönü Metro tram stop and within view of the Galata Bridge.

The exterior of the mosque boasts 66 domes and semi domes, as well as two minarets. You can, BTW, know the importance of a mosque by the number of minarets (towers). Only a sultan (or his family, who also carry the title of sultan, even the mother and daughters) could have a mosque with two minarets. Imagine how important that makes the Hagia Sophia (with four minarets) and The Blue Mosque (with 6).

This is where the ablutions really take place. Men were lined up to wash their feet, face, eyes and ears as required before prayers. Hey, at least they are clean! Bonus, you can almost always find a public rest room (WC) at a mosque. There may be a small donation to use it.
This is where the ablutions really take place. Men were lined up to wash their feet, face, eyes and ears as required before prayers. Hey, at least they are clean! Bonus, you can almost always find a public rest room (WC) at a mosque. There may be a small donation to use it.

An elegant şadırvan (ablution fountain) stands in the center courtyard, but is only ornamental. The actual ritual purifications are performed with water taps on the south wall of the mosque. Stone blocks supplied from the island of Rhodes were used in the construction of the mosque. The complete complex consists of a hospital (no longer in use), primary school, public baths, a türbe (cemetery), two public fountains and a market (The Spice Bazaar). The public square has undergone a recent renovation and the two fountains are now modern and new. Much of the rest was blocked from the public during renovations.

This woman sells wheat grain to feed the pigeons and they seem very well fed indeed. Fatih is the name of the district that the New Mosque is in. Belediyesi translates as "municipality." Odd the Turkish words I know, huh?
This woman sells wheat grain to feed the pigeons and they seem very well fed indeed. Fatih is the name of the district that the New Mosque is in. Belediyesi translates as “municipality.” Odd the Turkish words I know, huh?
Found this on the internet: "If you stop by the Yeni Camii at the entrance of the Spice bazaar (a.k.a The Egyptian Bazzar) you will surely observe the numerous flocks of pigeons feeding around the mosque. This is one of the most true and consistent vision of Istanbul, the pigeons and hence the pigeon feeders. The crowd of pigeons here is tremendous and honestly the season doesn’t matter at all. Here pigeons always rely on constant food provided by the locals or the tourists. Wheat supply is sold for very little money in mobile stalls ..... Continuous feeding ends up with overwhelming pigeons but still you feel like feeding them. This is one of the musts I do whenever I am in the neighbourhood. I buy a plate of wheat and scatter it around on the pigeons like throwing a frisbee. After your visit to the mosque spend some time with the pigeons and they will relax you while you watch the hordes fly from one feeder to the other. It might even be scary at some times as the pigeons swoosh before you, just inches above your head, or face. I always believe that this is a magic show that everyone has to experience for themselves."   http://www.spottedbylocals.com/istanbul/the-pigeon-feeder/
Found this on the internet: “If you stop by the Yeni Camii at the entrance of the Spice bazaar (a.k.a The Egyptian Bazzar) you will surely observe the numerous flocks of pigeons feeding around the mosque. This is one of the most true and consistent vision of Istanbul, the pigeons and hence the pigeon feeders. The crowd of pigeons here is tremendous and honestly the season doesn’t matter at all.
Here pigeons always rely on constant food provided by the locals or the tourists. Wheat supply is sold for very little money in mobile stalls ….. Continuous feeding ends up with overwhelming pigeons but still you feel like feeding them. This is one of the musts I do whenever I am in the neighbourhood. I buy a plate of wheat and scatter it around on the pigeons like throwing a frisbee.
After your visit to the mosque spend some time with the pigeons and they will relax you while you watch the hordes fly from one feeder to the other. It might even be scary at some times as the pigeons swoosh before you, just inches above your head, or face. I always believe that this is a magic show that everyone has to experience for themselves.”
The entrance to the court yard. So many steps everywhere!
The entrance to the court yard. So many steps everywhere!
It was a busy day and I didn't go inside.
It was a busy day and I didn’t go inside.

The Spice Bazaar

Spice Bazaar has a total of 85 shops selling spices, Turkish delight and other sweets, jewellery, souvenirs, and dried fruits and nuts.
Spice Bazaar has a total of 85 shops selling spices, Turkish delight and other sweets, jewellery, souvenirs, and dried fruits and nuts.

4/4/2015

The local name of the bazaar, built in 1664.
The local name of the bazaar, built in 1664.

The world knows this ancient market place at The Spice Bazaar, located behind Yeni Camii (Yen ee Jam ee, New Mosque) near the Galata Bridge. But to those who live in Istanbul, this is Mısır Çarşısı (Musur Char shuh suh) , meaning Egyptian Bazaar. Located in the Eminönü quarter of the Fatih district, it is the second most famous covered shopping complex, after the Grand Bazaar.

According to Wikipedia: The building was endowed to the foundation of the New Mosque, and got its name “Egyptian Bazaar” (Turkish: Mısır Çarşısı) because it was built with the revenues from the Ottoman eyalet of Egypt in 1660. The word mısır has a double meaning in Turkish: “Egypt” and “maize”. This is why sometimes the name is wrongly translated as “Corn Bazaar”. The bazaar was (and still is) the center for spice trade in Istanbul, but in the last years more and more shops of other type are replacing the spice shops.

Unfortunately, it’s mostly a tourist trap these days—mandatory to see, of course, but prices are high and it’s not where the locals shop.

The building itself is part of the complex of the New Mosque. The revenues from the rented shops inside the bazaar building are used for the up keep of the mosque. This seems to be a common scheme and perhaps Christian churches should do the same.
The building itself is part of the complex of the New Mosque. The revenues from the rented shops inside the bazaar building are used for the up keep of the mosque. This seems to be a common scheme and perhaps Christian churches should do the same.
You can almost hear the sea from this seller's stand. If the New Mosque (Yeni Camii) wasn't in the way, you could see it. In a word: fresh.
You can almost hear the sea from this seller’s stand. If the New Mosque (Yeni Camii) wasn’t in the way, you could see it. In a word: fresh.
This is Bazad panir--white cheese. No Turk worth his salt would start the day without this and a handful of olives.
This is Beyaz Panir–white cheese. No Turk worth his salt would start the day without this and a handful of olives with his çay (chai, tea).

 

You may enjoy this article on buying spices here at the bazaar. http://fxcuisine.com/default.asp?language=2&Display=77&resolution=high
You may enjoy this article on buying spices here at the bazaar.
Just outside the entrance is a new square, complete with benches and modern fountains. This was completed about a year ago. On this perfect early spring day, it was a busy place.
Just outside the entrance is a new square, with benches and modern fountains. This was completed about a year ago. On this perfect early spring day, it was a busy place.

Flower market and park, 2015-04-03, 6

Just outside the Spice Market was a flower market--which also had pets.
Just outside the Spice Market was a flower market–which also had pets…….
...and leeches. Ewwwww.
…and leeches. Ewwwww.
Pet supplies and flower seeds.
Pet supplies and flower seeds.
I am happy to report that I can actually read this sign, and not just the English translation at the bottom.
I am happy to report that I can actually read this sign, and not just the English translation at the bottom. Progress!

The Theodosian Walls

The 5th-century city walls built by Emperor Theodosius II stretch for 6.5 km (4 miles) from Istanbul's Golden Horn to the Sea of Marmara.  I initially thought this woman was foraging, but when I got closer I realized she had a garden. Most of the area in front of the walls seems to be produce!
The 5th-century city walls built by Emperor Theodosius II stretch for 6.5 km (4 miles) from Istanbul’s Golden Horn to the Sea of Marmara.
I initially thought this woman was foraging, but when I got closer I realized she had a garden. Most of the area in front of the walls seems to be produce!

4/4/2015

The tulips were in bloom!
The tulips were in bloom!

Today was Saturday, my only full day off, so I decided to spend a few hours walking in the bright sunshine of spring in Istanbul. My path? To follow the remains of the old city walls—known as the Theodosian Walls. They are one of the most impressive remains of the Byzantine past, and they held off invaders for more than 1,000 years! I walked from Topkapı Metro  (Pronounced: Top Kap Uh. That final letter isn’t an “I” it’s the vowel pronounced uh) south to the Marmara Sea. I walked around the sea park, investigated a few old city gates and cemeteries, and walked back. Probably 4 miles in all. I’ll sleep well tonight! I do a lot of walking here in Istanbul, so I’m glad I’m in fair shape.

Most of the walls are in pretty poor shape. I walked along side, but my guidebook was very clear that climbing the walls was unsafe in every way. There's the danger of falling and of being accosted by thieves. Many homeless and questionable characters hang out here.
Most of the walls are in pretty poor shape. I walked along side, but my guidebook was very clear that climbing the walls was unsafe in every way. There’s the danger of falling and of being accosted by thieves. Many homeless and questionable characters hang out here.

It was cool and breezy, but the sun shone all day—perfect walking weather. The tulips are in bloom and (my favorite) daffodils. It is spring in the city of cities!

Cats everywhere around the ruins--I see them all over the world.
Cats everywhere around the ruins–I see them all over the world.

With 11 fortified gates and 192 towers, this double walled enclosure sealed in the landward side of the old city of Constantinople. The length of the wall is about 4 miles (6km), so I saw approximately half of it today. It extends from the Sea of Marmara to the Golden Horn, enclosing an area of about 2.5 square miles. As with many important old Roman cities, the “walls” are actually three layers, each taller and thicker than the one before. A thick inner wall had 60 foot towers that gave a view of any approaching enemy, by land or sea. The outer wall was lower, 26 feet high, with additional towers, offset and between the inner wall towers, creating unblocked line of sight. Both walls were made of alternating limestone blocks and red tile brick. This arrangement is attractive and helped them to withstand earthquakes. Between the walls was a 50 foot terrace, used to move military troops easily. (in many cities, this area is where the bazaar is) A second terrace ended in a short crenelated defense wall. In front of it all was a moat (which may or may not have had water) which was 60 feet across and 20 feet deep. Even dry, the moat would have kept large artillery from coming too close.

The walls were built between AD 412-422 (dates vary), mostly during the reign of Emperor Theodosius II (408-50). At the time, they were half a mile outside the city’s original Walls of Constantine, extending the city’s protected area. Though the older Constantine Walls were still standing when the Theodosian Walls were built, nothing remains of them today. In 447 an earthquake destroyed 54 (some reports say 57) of the towers and much of the sea wall. The timing could not have been worse as Attila the Hun was already in the Balkans and on his way to take over the city. For 60 straight days and nights, the population labored to repair the walls.

This park is clearly dedicated to TULIPS. There is even a statue of two tulip bulbs. But, I preferred the daffodils at the far entrance.
This park is clearly dedicated to TULIPS. There is even a statue of two tulip bulbs. But, I preferred the daffodils at the far entrance.

Ultimately the city finally fell from sheer weight of numbers of the Ottoman forces in May 1453 after a six-week siege. According to Wikipedia, “The walls were largely maintained intact during most of the Ottoman period, until sections began to be dismantled in the 19th century, as the city outgrew its medieval boundaries. Despite the subsequent lack of maintenance, many parts of the walls survived and are still standing today. A large-scale restoration program has been under way since the 1980s.”     

Just inside this city gate is a mosque and cemetery (turbesi).
Just inside this city gate is a mosque and cemetery (turbesi).
The headstones look like turbans.
The headstones look like turbans.
A simple marble area to wash before entering the mosque. Of course, only the men can expose their feet to make the ritual ablutions before prayer. The women all crowd the bathrooms.
A simple marble area to wash before entering the mosque. Of course, only the men can expose their feet to make the ritual ablutions before prayer. The women all crowd the bathrooms.
My guidebook calls the neighborhood just inside the walls "working class." I think that's pretty diplomatic.
My guidebook calls the neighborhood just inside the walls “working class.” I think that’s pretty diplomatic.
The wall has several openings--formerly city gates. Most were narrow since they might be walled up in case of attack. I have no idea how the cars get through, though. This is two way traffic and there is only room for one car width. Visibility is nil through the wall. Eeek.
The wall has several openings–formerly city gates. Most were narrow since they might be walled up in case of attack. I have no idea how the cars get through, though. This is two way traffic and there is only room for one car width. Visibility is nil through the two layers of wall. Eeek.
This end of the wall is at the Sea of Marmara and is part of a park. It was a lovely day and lots of barges were on the water.
This end of the wall is at the Sea of Marmara and is part of a park. It was a lovely day and lots of barges were on the water.
It was lovely seeing families picnic along the Marble Tower, the end of the wall. This tower was once actually in the sea.
It was endearing to see families picnic along the Marble Tower, the end of the wall. This tower was once actually in the sea.
This tower is at the end of the wall, at the Sea or Marmara, now a park.
This tower is at the end of the wall, at the Sea or Marmara, now a park.